Face the Fats Quiz II Answers

1. C) Between 25 and 35 percent of total daily calories
Some people falsely believe they should eat as little fat as possible for good health. In fact, the American Heart Association recommends that between 25 to 35 percent of total daily calories be from fats.

2. A) True
Fats can have different effects on your cholesterol levels. Some fats increase cholesterol and some decrease it.

3. B) Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats
Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are the “better” fats that can lower the LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in the body and decrease your risk of heart disease. Most of the fats you consume should be monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

4. A) Avocados, olive oil, almonds
Avocados, olive oil and almonds typically contain high amounts of monounsaturated fats. Other examples include canola oil, peanut butter and many other nuts and seeds.

5. D) Salmon, soybean oil, sunflower seeds
Salmon, soybean oil and sunflower seeds typically contain high amounts of polyunsaturated fats. So do other oily fish such as trout and herring; corn oil and many other nuts and seeds such as walnuts.

6. A) True
Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential fats that your body needs to function properly. Your body doesn’t make them so you must get them through food. You can decrease your risk of heart disease by consuming more omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in place of saturated and trans fats.

7. B) False
All fats, regardless of the type, have the same number of calories per gram.

8. D) 9
All fats are equally high in calories (9 calories per gram) relative to carbohydrate and protein (4 calories per gram).

9. A) True
All oils contain 120 calories per tablespoon. Use oils in moderation to avoid excess calories.

10. B) False
All fats are equally high in calories (9 calories per gram) relative to carbohydrate and protein (4 calories per gram). Regardless of the source, if you eat more calories than you need, you will gain weight. To avoid weight gain, control the total amount of calories you consume. Replace the “bad” fats (saturated and trans fats) with the “better” fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats) to reduce your risk of heart disease.

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