Face the Fats Quiz Answers

1. Saturated fats and trans fats
The “bad” fats, saturated and trans fats, raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood.
2. Trans fats and saturated fats
The “bad” fats, saturated and trans fats, raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood and increase the risk of heart disease.
3. Trans fats
Partially hydrogenated oils are a source of industrially produced trans fats.
4. Prorated fats
Major types of fats are saturated, trans, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats. There is no such a thing as a “prorated fat.”
5. Bacon, cheeseburger, whole milk
Saturated fats occur naturally in many foods. The majority come mainly from animal sources, including meat and dairy products. These foods also contain dietary cholesterol. In addition, many baked goods and fried foods can contain high levels of saturated fats. Some plant foods, such as palm oil, palm kernel oil and coconut oil, also contain primarily saturated fats, but do not contain cholesterol.
6. French fries, cookies, shortening, stick margarine, doughnuts
Trans fats can be found in many foods – but especially in fried foods like French fries and doughnuts, and baked goods including pastries, pie crusts, biscuits, pizza dough, cookies, crackers, and traditional stick margarines and shortenings. You can determine the amount of trans fats in a particular packaged food by looking at the Nutrition Facts panel. You can also spot trans fats by reading ingredient lists and looking for the ingredients referred to as “partially hydrogenated oils.”
7.  7%
The American Heart Association recommends limiting your saturated fat consumption to less than 7 percent and trans fat consumption to less than 1 percent of your daily calories. Translating these percentages into numbers, that means if you eat 2,000 total calories a day, your daily limits should be: less than 15 grams (less than 140 of those calories) from saturated fats and less than 2 grams (less than 20 of those calories) from trans fats.
8. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats
The American Heart Association recommends most of the fats you eat every day be monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, while limiting saturated fats to be less than 7 percent and trans fats to be less than 1 percent of your total daily calories.
9. Less than 0.5 grams per serving
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows food companies to list the amount of trans fat as “0 grams” on the Nutrition Facts panel if the amount of trans fat is less than 0.5 grams per serving. Just note that if you eat several servings from a package that declares “0 trans fat”, it is possible to exceed your daily limit of trans fats.
10. False
Even if a food contains zero grams of cholesterol, it can be made with saturated fats – such as coconut and palm oils, and/or trans fats (like traditional stick margarines and shortenings). Saturated and trans fats raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood and increase the risk of developing heart disease.

Advertisements